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Dear Twitpic Community – thank you for all the wonderful photos you have taken over the years. We have now placed Twitpic kay electric bass patch numbers an archived state. Jump to navigation Jump to search This article is about the standard violin. The violin, also known informally as a fiddle, is a wooden string instrument in the violin family.

Most violins have a hollow wooden body. It is the smallest and highest-pitched instrument in the family in regular use. Violins are important instruments in a wide variety of musical genres. The violin was first known in 16th-century Italy, with some further modifications occurring in the 18th and 19th centuries to give the instrument a more powerful sound and projection. In Europe, it served as the basis for the development of other stringed instruments used in Western classical music, such as the viola.

The word “violin” was first used in English in the 1570s. The word “violin” comes from “Italian violino, diminutive of viola”. The violin is often called a fiddle, either when used in a folk music context, or even in Classical music scenes, as an informal nickname for the instrument. The word “fiddle” was first used in English in the late 14th century. The first makers of violins probably borrowed from various developments of the Byzantine lyra.

French king Charles IX ordered Andrea Amati to construct 24 violins for him in 1560. One of these “noble” instruments, the Charles IX, is the oldest surviving violin. Significant changes occurred in the construction of the violin in the 18th century, particularly in the length and angle of the neck, as well as a heavier bass bar. The majority of old instruments have undergone these modifications, and hence are in a significantly different state than when they left the hands of their makers, doubtless with differences in sound and response. To this day, instruments from the so-called Golden Age of violin making, especially those made by Stradivari, Guarneri del Gesù and Montagnana are the most sought-after instruments by both collectors and performers.

The majority of glued joints in the instrument use animal hide glue rather than common white glue for a number of reasons. The neck is usually maple with a flamed figure compatible with that of the ribs and back. It carries the fingerboard, typically made of ebony, but often some other wood stained or painted black on cheaper instruments. Ebony is the preferred material because of its hardness, beauty, and superior resistance to wear. The bridge is a precisely cut piece of maple that forms the lower anchor point of the vibrating length of the strings and transmits the vibration of the strings to the body of the instrument. Its top curve holds the strings at the proper height from the fingerboard in an arc, allowing each to be sounded separately by the bow. Very often the E string will have a fine tuning lever worked by a small screw turned by the fingers.

In the early years of the 20th century, strings were made of either gut or steel. Note that the pitch we hear is the peak around 200 Hz. A violin is tuned in fifths, in the notes G3, D4, A4, E5. The lowest note of a violin, tuned normally, is G3, or G below middle C. On rare occasions, the lowest string may be tuned down by as much as a fourth, to D3. The Helmholtz corner traveling back and forth along the string. The arched shape, the thickness of the wood, and its physical qualities govern the sound of a violin.

Patterns of the node made by sand or glitter sprinkled on the plates with the plate vibrated at certain frequencies, called Chladni patterns, are occasionally used by luthiers to verify their work before assembling the instrument. These smaller instruments are commonly used by young players, whose fingers are not long enough to reach the correct positions on full-sized instruments. While related in some sense to the dimensions of the instruments, the fractional sizes are not intended to be literal descriptions of relative proportions. With the violin’s closest family member, the viola, size is specified as body length in inches or centimeters rather than fractional sizes. However, each individual adult will determine which size of viola to use. Sometimes called a lady’s violin, these instruments are slightly shorter than a full size violin, but tend to be high-quality instruments capable of producing a sound that is comparable to that of fine full size violins. 5 String violin sizes may differ from the normal 4 string.